‚Wintrophy Eversteady ‚Hundekotaboul‘ brown dwarf Luhman 16B. Credit: ESO/I. Respekt||°

g

http://last.fm/listen/globaltags/rai
--------------------------------------------------------

http://irishstatutebook.ie/isbc/pui1781.html -so called ‚Braune Jungs imo Kultur & Kreativ‘ ideo … no statemens such stalemath clinical Kinderzimmer free fucks on only one exo ‚bread‘, and antisemitism on ‚Recht‘…

Edward II. to the Union. A.D. 1310-1800, London

– * 1Jazz.ru – Soul

What would you make of other sayings containing proper names like:

‚As rich as Croesus‘ (Croesus was a real Ancient Lydian king who was very rich)

‚As gloomy as Eeyore‘ (Eeyore is a gloomy fictional character)

As long as the referent is an identifiable real or fictional character there seems to be no problem. The treatment of a real character under Russell’s approach is straightforward and for a fictional character like Eeyore it is just referring to the properties that are ascribed to Eeyore in the relevant work of fiction (Winnie the Pooh, or The House at Pooh Corner).

Yes that’s a good point, ‚Larry‘ turns out was an Australian boxer. But 1) when a speaker is using this idiom, can we be certain that he is aware of who Larry really is? I am doubtful about this, and thus that would mean the speaker does not have a set of properties associated with Larry. 2) Mispronunciation resulted idiom does not seem to refer at all, e.g. ‚Something is the real McCoy‘ (meaning it’s genuine) was a mispronunciation of a Scottish name, in this instance it doesn‘t seem to refer to a person

brainpharte wrote:
It seems obvious to me that communicating the meaning of the source is the sine qua non of a faithful translation.